Teal Bowl with Popcorn Popper

Teal Bowl with Popcorn Popper, oil on linen, 18” x 26″

From Hushed Reverberations, my two-person exhibition with Karl Heerdt at Oxford Gallery, Rochester, NY, from March 17 through April 21. Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 on March 24.

Summer Twilight

Summer Twilight, oil on linen, 12″ x 16″

From Hushed Reverberations, my two-person exhibition with Karl Heerdt at Oxford Gallery, Rochester, NY, from March 17 through April 21. Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 on March 24.

Medusa, yet again

Alyssa Monks from her Instagram

“White is by far the most important color. It’s what oil painting is about.” —John Currin

How is it the soap is what’s sexy? Like the indulgent curls and folds of icing on a cake or cornices of snow or seafoam and cream. All that white with incisions of hair like Gorky’s linear arabesques. Drawing with hair, the joy of the little serpentine whiplashes straightening into dark where they almost disappear, and that eye peering out like a mermaid’s cresting through the roof of her salty home to take a curious peek at the guy sans raft, going under, just before he’s gone.

Sugar Bowl #2

Sugar Bowl #2, oil on linen 10″ x 16″

From Hushed Reverberations, my two-person exhibition with Karl Heerdt at Oxford Gallery, Rochester, NY, from March 17 through April 21. Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 on March 24.

Spiral Bowl with Flat Screen

Spiral Bowl with Flat Screen, oil on linen, 16” x 24”

From Hushed Reverberations, my two-person exhibition with Karl Heerdt at Oxford Gallery, Rochester, NY, from March 17 through April 21. Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 on March 24.

Snowcapped

Snowcapped, oil on linen, 10” x 16”

From Hushed Reverberations, my two-person exhibition with Karl Heerdt at Oxford Gallery, Rochester, NY, from March 17 through April 21. Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 on March 24.

Aerial photography, 1920

Not bad, huh? I wouldn’t mind seeing a shot of the photographer as he snapped this one. Free of Instagram filters, too! Jason Kottke on Instagram: “This is an aerial photograph of Edinburgh taken by Alfred Buckham circa 1920. He stood in the open cockpit of a plane while working, one leg tied to the seat for safety.” Full story on kottke.org.

Red Bartletts

Red Bartletts, oil on linen, 10″ x 18″

From Hushed Reverberations, my two-person exhibition with Karl Heerdt at Oxford Gallery, Rochester, NY, from March 17 through April 21. Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 on March 24.

 

Plums with Milton Avery

Plums with Milton Avery, oil on linen, 20” x 36”

From Hushed Reverberations, my two-person exhibition with Karl Heerdt at Oxford Gallery, Rochester, NY, from March 17 through April 21. Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 on March 24.

Patterns

Patterns, oil on linen, 10″ x 16″

From Hushed Reverberations, my two-person exhibition with Karl Heerdt at Oxford Gallery, Rochester, NY, from March 17 through April 21. Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 on March 24.

Light North and South

Light North and South, oil on linen, 12” x 20”

From Hushed Reverberations, my two-person exhibition with Karl Heerdt at Oxford Gallery, Rochester, NY, from March 17 through April 21. Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 on March 24.

Kiwi in Bottle Stand

Kiwi in Bottle Stand, oil on linen, 20” x 36”

From Hushed Reverberations, my two-person exhibition with Karl Heerdt at Oxford Gallery, Rochester, NY, from March 17 through April 21. Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 on March 24.

Everything Is Illuminated

Everything Is Illuminated, oil on linen, 18″ x 20″

From Hushed Reverberations, my two-person exhibition with Karl Heerdt at Oxford Gallery, Rochester, NY, from March 17 through April 21. Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 on March 24.

A born painter

Nightfall Study, Karl Heerdt, oil on linen panel

When I called Karl Heerdt last week he’d been out in his garage working on some sheet metal for the ’65 Mustang fastback he’s been restoring. I had no idea he did this, and to hear him talk about it filled me with instant envy. He loves simply getting under a hood and replacing pistons and rocker arms and carburetors. Yet he also doesn’t mind reselling what amounts to a completely new classic American car he’s put together with a little help from his friends. He did this recently with a Shelby Cobra replica, which is about to make its way back into his garage for a few more tweaks before his buyer takes delivery.

“Oh you bastard,” I said, but I’m not sure he heard me, because he was laughing at the fact that he was glad to come inside to answer the phone and get warm again. An upstate New York March can be as cruel as April, both here in Pittsford and down the turnpike in Tonawanda as well. “I’d love to have the tools to tear down an old 70s car and rebuild it. You’re living my dream.”

“It doesn’t take all that many special tools,” he said. “We got sheet metal replaced, hood and doors and things. It’s way more work than I expected. We completely tore it apart and did a complete rebuild on the engine and transmission and drive train. So everything is new. We updated the suspension, and we lowered it.”

You can get a glimpse of the car on his Instagram feed, still a dull matte gray from the primer coat. It’s one of the earliest Mustangs, a few years before the rumbling Highland Green menace Steve McQueen made famous in Bullitt. It takes us a while to get around to talking about his painting, because I go off on a tangent about how Dave Hickey wrote an essay in which he extolled car customization as a form of three-dimensional art. I couldn’t agree more, partly on philosophical grounds but also because it would give me an excuse to spend a year in my own garage learning how to take a small block V-8 apart and put it back together in a way that wouldn’t turn it into a massive paper weight.

Heerdt is my co-exhibitor at Oxford Gallery right now, in a show entitled Hushed Reverberations (Jim Hall borrowed it from a Santayana quote), MORE

Eros

Eros, oil on linen, 12 x 16

From Hushed Reverberations, my two-person exhibition with Karl Heerdt at Oxford Gallery, Rochester, NY, from March 17 through April 21. Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 on March 24.

The Good Place

(Photo by: Ron Batzdorff/NBC)

Kristen Bell, recently deceased: So, who was right?

Ted Danson, afterlife engineer: Right?
About the afterlife?

Oh well, Hindus. They were about 5 percent right. Jews, Christians, Buddhists, all were about 5 percent right. Everybody was about 5 percent right, except for Doug Forcett.

Who’s Doug Forcett?

Doug was a stoner kid who lived in Calgary in the 1970s. One night he got really high on mushrooms and his best friend Randy said hey what do you think happens when you die and Doug launched into this long monologue where he got right 92 percent correct. We couldn’t believe what we were hearing. That’s him up there matter of fact. He’s pretty famous around here.

<He has his goofy portrait on the wall.>

Generally speaking there’s a good place and a bad place. You’re in the good place. You’re OK Eleanor.

Who’s in the bad place?

Every U.S. president ever except Lincoln.  Mozart, Picasso, Elvis, basically every artist ever.

 

Begonias and Dahlias

Begonias and Dahlias, oil on linen, 26″ x 52″

From Hushed Reverberations, my two-person exhibition with Karl Heerdt at Oxford Gallery, Rochester, NY, from March 17 through April 21. Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 on March 24.

 

Breakfast with Golden Raspberries

Breakfast with Golden Raspberries, oil on linen, 30″ x 46″

From Hushed Reverberations, my two-person exhibition with Karl Heerdt at Oxford Gallery, Rochester, NY, from March 17 through April 21. Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 on March 24.

Bowl with Stovetop

Bowl with Stovetop, oil on linen, 12″ x 18″

From Hushed Reverberations, my two-person exhibition with Karl Heerdt at Oxford Gallery, Rochester, NY, from March 17 through April 21. Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 on March 24.

Blues, Browns, and Gray

Blues, Browns, and Gray, oil on linen, 10″ x 16″

From Hushed Reverberations, my two-person exhibition with Karl Heerdt at Oxford Gallery, Rochester, NY, from March 17 through April 21. Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 on March 24.